Every Day Painting

Over the past few years, my biggest growth as an artist has come from the understanding that not every painting needs to be my best work of art. Not every sketch needs to have a deeper meaning. Sometimes a painting is just a painting. This understanding has helped me paint every day, even when not inspired. Through painting every day I have found beauty in the mundane. I have artistic confidence in every corner.

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Life on the Streets

Painting little snippets of life on any given street is becoming a favorite past time of mine. The following two paintings are of practically random buildings. They are both quite small works. Each was completed in a relatively short amount of time. I feel the speed in which they were painted contribute to their intimacy and vitality.

Miami Security Building. Watercolor paint, pen, and ink on paper. 4.5″ x 6″ (11.4 cm x 15.2 cm).

Unframed: $100.00

Wells Fargo Corner. Watercolor paint, pen, and ink on paper. 4.5″ x 6″ (11.4 cm x 15.2 cm).

Unframed: $100.00

The Clayton House

Last night, I attended my last college party ever. One of my closest friends just graduated. This marks the end of an era. To commemorate the occasion, I painted a picture of the table on which I’ve played countless games of Kings, War, Bull, Clever Endeavor, the Drawing Game, and other drinking favorites.

It was a fun time, but, you know what? I’m happy to end that chapter of my life. I was never very good at beer pong.

Last College Party. Watercolor and Ink on Paper. 9″ x 12″.

SOLD

Click to enlarge image.

Mural at The Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Complex

The mural at The Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Complex in Atlantic City, NJ is the largest I’ve ever painted. It is approximately sixty feet long and ten feet high. Due to its dimensions, photographing the piece was particularly difficult.

This is my second mural in conjunction with Stockton’s Center for Community Schools. The mural was made possible by the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, the Noyes Museum of Art, Lowe’s, and the Atlantic County Board of Education. Special thanks to the African American Heritage Museum of Southern New Jersey for aiding in the research process. The mural depicts Black history of Atlantic City. Sarah Spencer Washington, Jacob Lawrence, Art Dorrington, Johanna Leseign, John Henry “Pop” Lloyd, and James Usry are some of the figures included in the work.



Detail of Sarah Spencer Washington and Pop Lloyd:

Two eighth graders assisting with painting of Ms. America and the Convention Center:

Me, working during the early stages of the mural:


Click to enlarge images.

Power the Toaster!

This weekend, Chris Reyes, Tom Enright, Kevin Tracy, John O’Malley, Mike Pepplar, and I made a video game for Game Jam 6. Our time limit was 48 hours. Given the time constraint, I’m very happy with our results. You play as Zap, an electric spark whose sole goal in life is to successfully travel from a power cord to a toaster enabling toast to be created and freed from its toaster prison.

Below are a few of the backgrounds I painted for the game.

Here is a sheet of some of our characters.

Click here for a screenshot.

Dribbble Dave

Artists today are some of the luckiest of all time. The internet has afforded artists the ability to speak directly to their audience, without the filter of an art dealer or gallery. Immediately after finishing a work I can post it online. The work will be seen by hundreds of people before it is even a day old. While there is nothing like looking at a painting in person, social networking allows artists to share exactly what they are creating while they are creating it.

I am a huge fan of what sites like Twitter, Facebook, Deviant Art, My Space, and Flickr have done for contemporary creatives. Recently, I was invited to join Dribbble. Dribbble is like Twitter, but for designers and illustrators. Updates are called “shots,” as they are small screen shots of your current work. There are a lot of basketball references (not all of which I understand). I was lucky enough to get “drafted” to Dribbble by the very visually talented David Everly.  To show Dave my gratitude, I painted the following abstract portrait of Dave’s current Twitter avatar.

Dribbble Dave. Watercolor and ink on paper. 6″ x 5″.

Unframed: $200.00

Big, Comfy Chair

My newest watercolor is of a large and welcoming chair.

Comfy Chair. Watercolor and ink on paper. 6″ x 5″.

Unframed: $150.00

Spring Kitchen

Spring is here! The kitchen below was painted with the colors of this fresh season in mind.

Expect some new outdoor watercolors soon, if the weather stays this nice.

Spring Kitchen. Watercolor and ink on paper. 8″ x 11.5″

Unframed: $250.00

Peafowl

Once again,I am working with the  Haddon Township Beautification Comity. Last fall, in their SOHA district, I painted Pauline. This spring, I will begin working on another large potter’s plant mural. The painting will be of a peacock and a peahen. While I have no concrete design yet, here are some peafowl studies I’ve done in preparation. Thursday, I head to town to pick the perfect pot for my peafowl pair.

Papyrus Peacock. Ink on cotton paper. 5″x5″.

Unframed: $100.00

Peahen Ink. Ink on cotton paper. 5″x5″.

Unframed: $100.00

If there are any artists in the South New Jersey or Philadelphia area interested in designing a mural for the White Horse Pike’s beatification, please contact me.

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