Mamma MOMA

Going to the Museum of Modern Art in New York is spiritually uplifting. It reminds me why I paint. It reminds me that I am not alone in my need to paint. Walking around the MOMA brings me almost to tears. I get sappy just thinking about it. The power of the art housed in that building cannot be expressed in words. The block emanates beauty. The following pieces were painted on site in New York after the recent visit to my favorite museum.

Central Park, Inspired by Impressionism:

After Noon Fall. Watercolor and ink on cotton paper. 6″ x 5.5″ (15.2cm x 14cm).

Unframed: $200.00

The MOMA Sculpture Garden, Inspired by Expressionism:

Water Soluble. Watercolor and ink on paper. 5.5″ x 3.5″.

Unframed: $100.00

Alberto Giacometti’s Tall Figure III, Inspired by Existentialism

A Cafe Plant, Inspired by Constructionalism:

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A Series

Artemisia Gentileschi, the great Baroque artist, found the repetition of subject matter cathartic. Claude Monet, the visionary Impressionist, thought a subject could not be understood until it was painted multiple times. Andy Warhol, the renowned Pop artist, believed the more you make, the more you can sell.

In the spirit of the prolific artists that came before me, here are two more depictions of my mangled little foot.

Lingerie. Watercolor and ink on paper. 6″ x 5″.

Unframed: $200.00

A Setup. Ink on paper. 6″ x 5″.

Unframed: $100.00

Mural at The Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Complex

The mural at The Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Complex in Atlantic City, NJ is the largest I’ve ever painted. It is approximately sixty feet long and ten feet high. Due to its dimensions, photographing the piece was particularly difficult.

This is my second mural in conjunction with Stockton’s Center for Community Schools. The mural was made possible by the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, the Noyes Museum of Art, Lowe’s, and the Atlantic County Board of Education. Special thanks to the African American Heritage Museum of Southern New Jersey for aiding in the research process. The mural depicts Black history of Atlantic City. Sarah Spencer Washington, Jacob Lawrence, Art Dorrington, Johanna Leseign, John Henry “Pop” Lloyd, and James Usry are some of the figures included in the work.



Detail of Sarah Spencer Washington and Pop Lloyd:

Two eighth graders assisting with painting of Ms. America and the Convention Center:

Me, working during the early stages of the mural:


Click to enlarge images.