Stained Glass Style

I’ve been playing with bold lines lately. I don’t consider either of these paintings complete, but I enjoy the direction they are taking me.

knight

dressup

Advertisements

Lies and Good Intentions

I got bored with the seven deadly sins thing. So yeah, that series is over now. Here are a couple hares and my condolences.

Live Music

Nothing makes me want to create more than experiencing live music. Performance fills me with inspiration. Below is a drawing of my good friend Sean Breslin. Last Friday, he played at Grooveground. I was there, and so were a lot of my friends and family. It was a wonderful evening. Music brings people together in a way I’m not sure visual art can. If you get a chance, check out Sean’s music. Powerful stuff.

Constructive Criticism

I graduated college six years ago this month. The thing I miss about art school is honest critique from my piers. My time at the Savannah College of Art Design taught me that you can never see your painting as others do. Honest critique is pivotal for the growth of an artist.

As time goes by, I make more connections within the art world. In this grown up art world, constructive criticism is frowned upon. This is something I often forget. My biggest social blunders come from discussing a painting with its creator. I mean no harm with my comments. Just the opposite, a painting that demands critique is a painting I adore. College taught me that the only improvement comes from understanding weakness. How am I supposed to improve if everyone is too afraid to offend by speaking the truth? Feedback is something I crave, so it is something I give freely. One day, I will meet an artist who will crit my work freely. In return I will give the helpful criticism SCAD taught me to dish out. Until then, I should learn to shut my big, fat mouth.

Crit Me. Watercolor and ink on cotton paper. 6″ x 5.5″ (15.2cm x 14cm).

Unframed: $250.00

NYC OWS

I’ve just returned from New York city. Already, I miss it.

Up until now, my paintings of the Occupy Wall Street movement have been from photographs. It is not very fulfilling to paint from photographs. I went to New York so I could paint from life. And I painted a lot.

#OWS. Watercolor and ink on paper. 6″ x 7″.

Unframed: $200.00

It was shocking how many people at the demonstration were not protesting. It seemed there were more journalists and people taking pictures then there were occupiers. That was a common theme in New York. New Yorkers seems to prefer recording and observing life more than participating. The following sketch is of the back of a CNN reporter. Her lights were bright, and her cameras never stopped running.

It was tough to get a good painting spot in the hectic, protesting park. There were marches and performance art, reporters and giant puppets. The landscape was ever changing. The people occupying Wall Street were constantly cleaning. They moved tents to scrub the sidewalk. There was a whole crew of people in masks that did nothing but wander the park and sweep. When I was there, the square smelled more like Pine-Sol than a corner of New York.

The last painting I completed of those standing  for the 99% is a little more abstract than my usual watercolors. I wanted to capture the constant motion, the idea that there is something happening here.

What It Is. Watercolor and ink on paper. 6″ x 5.5″.

Unframed: $200.00

The Clockwork Queen

Just because I’ve never seen a machine elf, doesn’t mean I don’t believe.

Clockwork Queen. Watercolor and ink on paper. 7″ x 5.5″.

Unframed: $150.00

Freshly Painted

Sometimes, when I can’t sleep, I just lie in bed and worry about silly things that never seem to matter much in the morning. Other times, when I can’t sleep, I get out of bed and paint instead.

Midnight Issues. Watercolor, ink, salt, and worries on paper. 6″ x 5.5″.

Unframed: $200.00

The Drawing of the Three

On October first, my husband and I threw a huge party celebrating our recent marriage. My sister Maria, my sister Brianna, and I got our hair done together. As the three of us are artists, we each drew a sketch while waiting for our turn in the seat. This is one of the very few blog posts that will include drawings I did not make. I am the oldest of the three. Maria is five years younger than I am. Brianna is ten years younger than Maria.

My drawing of Maria getting her hair done:


Maria’s drawing of me getting my hair done:


Brianna’s drawing of me getting my hair done:

These drawings are dear to me and are not for sale.

Return to Marble Hornets

After a short break, I’ve continued my slender paintings. Below is entry 6.

Entry 6 0:27. Mixed media on paper. 5″ x 5″.

Unframed: $250.00

A Series

Artemisia Gentileschi, the great Baroque artist, found the repetition of subject matter cathartic. Claude Monet, the visionary Impressionist, thought a subject could not be understood until it was painted multiple times. Andy Warhol, the renowned Pop artist, believed the more you make, the more you can sell.

In the spirit of the prolific artists that came before me, here are two more depictions of my mangled little foot.

Lingerie. Watercolor and ink on paper. 6″ x 5″.

Unframed: $200.00

A Setup. Ink on paper. 6″ x 5″.

Unframed: $100.00

« Older entries