The Heart of New York

Union Square stole my heart. Something about this corner of New York is different. The materialism fades, the cliques meld, and eye contact with strangers is made. If I lived near NYC I would paint this park all the time. This was painted on site, looking down Broadway from the steps of Union Square.

When Honest. Watercolor and ink on cotton paper. 6″ x 5.5″ (15.2cm x 14cm).

Unframed: $225.00

The heart of New York is obvious. It’s the people. During my visit I drew residents and tourists alike. Even as an outsider, it was easy to make out who was who. I drew them in parks, in museums, at protests, and on trains. It was my goal to draw fast enough to not get caught. Here are a couple pages of my discreet sketches.

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Always Sunny

When I’m in the suburbs, I paint tall buildings. When I’m in the city, I paint park scenes. I don’t get it either.

Below is another painting of Rittenhouse Square. Philadelphia in late summer makes me smile.

Eye Contact. Watercolor paint and ink on paper. 4.5″ x 6″ (11.4 cm x 15.2 cm).

Unframed: $215.00

No Parking Lot

My work is not about the interaction between the natural world and the human made world. That would imply that somehow the human made world is unnatural.

In the art world, words like “juxtaposition” are used exclusively to describe two objects that don’t belong together. That is absurd. At one time there were objects that could shock simply by being placed next to one another. But this is the post, post modern world and the age of the internet. There is no “shock.” Every object is just as connected to, or disconnected from, the next. A leaf is no more connected to another leaf than it is to a car or a photograph of Ronald Reagan.

The connection (and subsequential disconnection) each object has with the object next to it is what my work is about. Whether the objects involved are organic or geometric is irrelevant.

No Parking Lot. Watercolor and Ink on paper. 7″ x 6″ (17.8 cm x 15.2 cm).

Unframed: $200.00